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The 20 Biggest Movie Flops of the Last Decade

About 100 movies from big studios are released in theaters each year. That means around 1,000 Hollywood productions hit the theaters in the last decade. That’s a lot of movies vying for people’s limited time — and the stakes have never been higher. Big budget movies cost several hundred million to make and market, requiring them to achieve massive box office takes to turn a profit.

As the saying goes, the bigger they are the harder they fall. These 45 movies from the past 10 years didn’t just fall; they wiped out in spectacular fashion. Many are some of the biggest box office disasters of all time.

*Note: Losses have been adjusted for inflation. Grosses and budgets are from Box Office Mojo. Loss figures are from a variety of sources, including Filmsite, The Hollywood Reporter, Deadline, Variety and Bomb Report.

1-The Beaver

film The Beaver
 Mel Gibson is the star of “The Beaver,” and that proved to be a poor choice. Filming for “The Beaver” wrapped in 2010, right around the time that Gibson left a furious, racist rant on his ex-girlfriend’s phone. The movie was pulled from its original release date and premiered at a later date, taking in less than $1 million domestically. Overseas it took in $7.3 million, but after theaters took their cut, Summit Entertainment was left with half of that or less. It’s not clear exactly how much “The Beaver” lost, but we’re pegging it at about $20 million after adjusting for inflation.

Year: 2011
Budget: $21 million
Domestic gross: $970,816
Worldwide gross: $7.3 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $20 million

2- Hellboy

film Hellboy
 Lionsgate chose to leave Ron Pearlman and Guillermo del Toro out of the 2019 “Hellboy” reboot, opting instead for a smaller budget movie that could turn a profit. It didn’t. The movie was a stinking pile of kitty litter with a worldwide gross that couldn’t even cover the paltry budget.

Year: 2019
Budget: $50 million
Domestic gross: $21.9 million
Worldwide gross: $44.66 million
Loss: $40 million

 3-That’s My Boy

film That’s My Boy
“That’s My Boy” was one of those garbage movies with Adam Sandler before he started making garbage movies for Netflix. Critics called it gross and offensive, while most people called it another Sandler movie they skipped.

According to Bomb Report, Sony would net about $31.7 million, meaning this movie lost a minimum of $38 million in 2012 without accounting for marketing.

Year: 2012
Budget: $70 million
Domestic gross: $36.9 million
Worldwide gross: $57.72 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $42.6 million

4-Solo: A Star Wars Story

film Solo: A Star Wars Story
Disney’s attempt at a Han Solo backstory ended up being a ham-fisted tale that put the brakes on theatrical “Star Wars” spin-offs. Its giant budget and so-so story made “Solo” the first “Star Wars” movie to ever lose money at the box office. One industry analyst estimated the film lost between $50 and $80 million.

Year: 2018
Budget: $275 million
Domestic gross: $213.78
Worldwide gross: $392.92
Loss (inflation adjusted): $50-$80 million

5-The Oogieloves in the Big Balloon Adventure

film The Oogieloves in the Big Balloon Adventure
“Oogieloves” is a 2012 kids musical movie that marketed itself as an interactive experience, encouraging kids to sing and dance along with the Oogieloves, which appear to be a fusion of Teletubbies and Troll Dolls. Perhaps not wanting to be part of an 88-minute nightmare of multi-colored singing creatures in a theater full of rambunctious children, adults chose to skip the film.

And oh, how it bombed. On its first day, the movie made less than $103,000.  And while its budget was $20 million, the Los Angeles Times reported that the movie cost a whopping $60 million all-in, meaning the movie lost $59 million in 2012.
Year: 2012
Budget: $20 million
Domestic gross: $1.1 million
Worldwide gross: $1.1 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $66 million

6-The Mummy

film The Mummy
Universal Pictures’ now-forgotten attempt at launching its “Dark Universe” franchise — a series of movies revolving around the Universal monsters — started and ended with “The Mummy.” Deadline estimated that Tom Cruise’s creature feature was tracking to lose $95 million in an article published shortly before the film left theaters. While “The Mummy” ended with a theatrical run of more than Deadline’s estimated $375 million, the least “The Mummy” likely lost was around $60 million.

Year: 2017
Budget: $125 million
Domestic gross: $80.23 million
Worldwide gross: $409.2
Loss (inflation adjusted): $63-$100 million

7- A Wrinkle in Time

film A Wrinkle in Time
“A Wrinkle in Time” had a lot of goodwill before it hit theaters. With Ava DuVernay at the helm, it was the first $100-million-budget film to be directed by a black woman, it was based on the beloved children’s book of the same name and it was given the Oprah bump (granted, she also starred in the movie).

There was also a huge marketing push from Disney, but audiences didn’t seem to care — most of them were still buying tickets for “Black Panther,” which was then in its fourth weekend.

According to Bomb Report, the film lost around $70 million, offsetting some of the profits that Disney enjoyed from “Black Panther.”
Year: 2018
Budget: $100 million
Domestic gross: $100.47 million
Worldwide gross: $132.67 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $70 million

8-Deepwater Horizon

film Deepwater Horizon
The Deepwater Horizon disaster killed 11 workers and jettisoned about four million barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico over 87 days. Louisiana fisherman are still dredging up mutant fish. The disaster was an epic one, yet audiences weren’t willing to pay to see a movie about the rig explosion itself.

Year: 2016
Budget: $110 million
Domestic gross: $61.4 million
Worldwide gross: $121.8 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $64-$120 million

 9-How Do You Know

film How Do You Know
On paper, “How Do You Know” should have been a smash hit. It’s a romantic comedy by James L. Brooks, starring Jack Nicholson, Paul Rudd, Reese Witherspoon and Owen Wilson — what could go wrong? Well, the budget was $120 million — a ridiculous amount for a romantic comedy, but these big-time stars commanded huge fees. Witherspoon received $15 million, Nicholson got $12 million and Wilson was paid $10 million, while Rudd received just $3 million, according to the Hollywood Reporter. And unfortunately, the movie just sort of stunk, so word of mouth kept people far away. “How Do You Know” is Nicholson’s last role, which is just depressing.

Year: 2010
Budget: $120 million
Domestic gross: $30.2 million
Worldwide gross: $48.7 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $88.6-$122.4 million

10-Ghostbusters

Ghostbusters
Some franchise fans were skeptical of an all-female “Ghostbusters” reboot, and the bar to deliver a movie on par with the beloved originals was set high. Critical responses were positive, but general audiences were lukewarm to the movie while a swarm of online trolls was downright vicious about the movie’s mere existence. The movie holds a 74 percent critics and 50 percent audience rating at Rotten Tomatoes.

Year: 2016
Budget: $144 million
Domestic gross: $128.35 million
Worldwide gross: $229.15 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $75 million

 11-Gemini Man

film Gemini Man
“You made a person out of another person? Then you sent me to kill him?” So says an incredulous Will Smith in the “Gemini Man” trailer, which actually featured two Will Smiths. This tale of two Smiths cost an additional $100 million to market, ratcheting up total costs to the $240 million range. After theaters take their cut, the budget might be recouped.

Not many people went to see “Gemini Man,” and it didn’t help that Ang Lee’s film was to be seen in 120 fps 4k 3D technology — which might have been cool, but there were no theaters in America that could handle it.


Year: 2019
Budget: $139 million
Domestic gross: $48.5 million
Worldwide gross: $172.6 million
Loss: $75 million 

12-The Great Wall

film The Great Wall
Universal Pictures and China Film Group backed this Matt Damon movie, with studios aiming for it to dip deep into that sweet Chinese box office honeypot. But Asian audiences may not have liked the idea of a Westerner having the lead role in a Chinese-based film, and western audiences just shrugged and went to see something else. The movie only made $171 million in China and lost an estimated $74.5 million according to Deadline.

Year: 2016
Budget: $150 million
Domestic gross: $44.5 million
Worldwide gross: $335 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $80 million

13-Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows

film Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows 2016
2014’s “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” was a huge hit, grossing $493 million worldwide and even started a whole new toy line for the 35-year-old property. Everything was looking great, so Paramount greenlit another big-budget production. But for whatever reason, the movie completely flopped in North America but fared better overseas.

By the time theaters took their cut and the marketing budget was accounted for, there was nothing bodacious about Paramount’s bottom line for this film.

Year: 2016
Budget: $135 million
Domestic gross: $82 million
Worldwide gross: $245.6 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $80 million

14-The Finest Hours

film The Finest Hours 2016
This historical drama, starring Chris Pine and Casey Affleck, is about the United States Coast Guard’s dramatic rescue of a sinking ship in 1952. The movie received ok reviews but audiences didn’t care to see it. Disney announced it would take a $75 million loss shortly after the film flopped at the worldwide box office.

Year:  2016
Budget: $80 million
Domestic gross: $27.57 million
Worldwide gross: $52 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $80.4 million

15-Rise of the Guardians

film Rise of the Guardians 2012
DreamWorks’ “Rise of the Guardians” wasn’t a bad movie — it was nominated for Best Animated Feature Film at the 70th Golden Globes — but it had a woefully turgid budget. At the time, animated films were expected to pull in at least $150 million domestically. That proved to no longer be the case. Coupled with a “reduced” $150 million global marketing budget, the movie was fated to flop.

This movie’s failure caused the layoffs of about 350 DreamWorks employees after the company posted an $83 million loss the following quarter, all of which was due to the failure of “Rise of the Guardians.”

Year: 2012
Budget: $145 million
Domestic gross: $103.4 million
Worldwide gross: $306.94 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $83 million

16-Robin Hood

film Robin Hood 2018
“Robin Hood” didn’t just miss the bullseye; it missed the entire target. The nearly two-hour feature holds a 15 percent critical rating and a 41 percent audience score at Rotten Tomatoes, indicating that the few people who paid money to see this turkey over Thanksgiving break felt robbed. Deadline estimates the movie lost Lionsgate $83.7 million.

Year: 2018
Budget: $100 million
Domestic gross: $30.82 million
Worldwide gross: $85.88 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $83.7 million

17-Ben-Hur

film Ben-Hur 2016
Banking on a large religious audience turnout turned out to be a blunder for MGM and Paramount’s “Ben-Hur,” which started the box office race at No. 4 on opening day and fell well behind the competition with each following weekend. MGM, which financed 80 percent of the picture, took a $47.8 million write-down, putting its 2016 Q3 earnings in the red by $20 million.

Year: 2016
Budget: $100 million
Domestic gross: $26.4 million
Worldwide gross: $94 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $81.5-$131 million

18-Rock of Ages

film Rock of Ages 2012
So Tom Cruise, Bryan Cranston, Alec Baldwin and Catherine Zeta-Jones made a glam band musical, singing songs like “Juke Box Hero,” “Paradise City” and “Rock You Like a Hurricane.” Here’s Cruise singing “Wanted Dead or Alive.”

According to Bomb Report, Warner Bros. netted about $33.5 million after theaters took their cut, which was also less than it took to market the $75 million picture. We’re going to low-ball this one and say it cost $110 million to make and market, meaning it lost about $77 million in 2012 dollars.

Year: 2012
Budget: $75 million
Domestic gross: $38.5 million
Worldwide gross: $59.42 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $86 million

 19-Fantastic Four

film Fantastic Four 2015
2015’s “Fantastic Four” was a disaster from start to finish. Director Josh Trank publicly bashed the movie before it was released, blaming studio execs for meddling with his original cut (and this past Thanksgiving, bashed Marvel movies before quitting Twitter). The movie was terrible.20th Century Fox should be thankful that it only lost $80 million.
 
Year: 2015
Budget: $120 million
Domestic gross: $56 million
Worldwide gross: $167.9 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $87 million

20-Hugo

film Hugo 2011
 Lavished with critical praise but ignored by audiences, Martin Scorsese’s dip into family-friendly territory proved to be a box office burn out. The Hollywood Reporter said losses were “north of $80 million,” and the film caused some stress between Scorsese and his financiers.

Year: 2011
Budget: $150-$180 million
Domestic gross: $73.86 million
Worldwide gross: $185.77 million
Loss (inflation adjusted): $91.5 million




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